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Types of Donation

At LifeSource, we support the process of donation by working with deceased donors who can give organs, eyes and tissue to save and heal others. Whether it’s some or all depends on a variety of factors including how they pass away, health status and strength of the organs.

Living donation is another incredible way you can help save the life of someone waiting for an organ transplant by working directly with transplant centers. Through living donation, a living person can donate a kidney or part of the liver, lung, intestine or pancreas to another person in need of a transplant.

Deceased Donation

Organs
Through organ donation, one person can save up to eight lives. Deceased organ donors can donate:

Kidney Icon
Liver
Lungs
Heart
Pancreas
Intestines

Tissue and Eyes
Tissue donation differs from organ donation in several ways. First, there is no waiting list for most tissue transplants, and the tissues are available when someone needs them. Organs must be transplanted within hours of recovery; tissue donations can be packaged and kept for up to five years. Donated tissues can be used to help and heal people in several different and meaningful ways.

Examples of donated tissues include:

  • Bones and tendons can replace or reconstruct tissue destroyed by tumors or trauma. Achilles tendon ruptures are common sports injuries that rely on donor tissue for repair.
  • Heart valves replace damaged ones, allowing the heart to function again. Valves used in young patients will actually grow with them.
  • Veins/arteries help patients needing coronary artery bypass surgery. Patients suffering from diabetes or other diseases that cause a decrease in the blood flow can receive donated veins to repair damaged vessels and restore blood flow.
  • Skin is used to treat burns, repair cleft palates and complete mastectomy reconstruction.
  • Corneas restore sight to the blind.

Living Donation

Through living donation, a living person can donate a kidney or part of the liver, lung, intestine or pancreas to another person in need of a transplant.

There are many factors to look at when considering living donation. Things such as blood type and overall health are factors when considering becoming a living donor. Each potential living donor must go through a full medical evaluation that includes lab tests, a physical examination and a psychosocial examination. The decision about whether to accept the living donor is then made by the health care team at the transplant center.

Living donation is a process facilitated directly through transplant centers. For more information please contact one of our partner transplant centers.