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Tribute to True Heroes: Thank you, Veterans!

We took some time to talk with a few of our team members who have selflessly served our country. How has their service influenced their role in the organ, eye and tissue donation community?

Today we thank our brave men and women for their service. Each day we live in freedom because of the sacrifices they have made and continue to make. Thank you, Veterans!

We took some time to ask some of our LifeSource team members how their service has influenced their role in donation.

Emily Larimer

Platoon 1, Ft. Dix, NJ. August 31, 1990 – Top/Center.

When did you serve?

I served from 1990-1994 as U.S. Army Reservist in Minneapolis, MN.  My MOS/role was as a 98C: Signals Intelligence Analyst.

How did your service impact the work you do now?

The greatest impact from my service is my deeper appreciation for Veterans, servicemen, and servicewomen.  This appreciation motivated me to apply and work as a nurse at VA BHHCS at Ft Meade VAMC for eight years.  I sought to offer my heart and skills to Veterans.

Learn more about Emily and her role at LifeSource here.

Kristi Roers

When did you serve?

I entered the military in 1985 as a nurse.  I was stationed in the ICU at Offutt AFB in Nebraska and the CCU/Cardiac Cath Lab at Travis AFB in California.  I served in Desert Storm deploying to England as part of an air evacuation base and was the lowest ranking charge nurse of an intermediate ICU.  I left active duty after 8 years and continued in the reserves working as an ICU nurse, nurse educator and assistant to the Chief Nursing Officer.  I retired in 2015 after serving 30 years.  It was a wonderful experience and people I met were like family and places I served were unforgettable.  So many things happened during my career that shaped me into the nurse that I am and I will be forever grateful for that 30 years.

How did your service impact the work you do now?

Being a nurse in the ICU I saw patients that were dying and how the opportunity to become a donor evolved over my nursing career.  It was not thought of when I first went into this field and to see where it is now is such an honor to be a part of in helping give the gift of life to others.

David Paulson

When did you serve?

I was in the United States Air Force from 1986 until near the end of Desert Storm in 1991. My role in the military was as a medical technician/paramedic.

How did your service impact the work you do now?

After serving I continued to be inspired to work in the medical field helping others.